Wake up, Kick Ass, Period. #greenperiod #eco-friendly

WUKA

I have a pair of bright red big pants that are approximately 20 years old and have affectionately become known as my period pants. Like a beacon they brightly inform all and sundry (well, my husband) that it is that TOTM.

So I’m well accustomed to less than attractive lingerie options when necessary. I’m also fully apprised of the damage done to the environment by disposable sanitary products. As the Women’s Environmental Network states, women in the UK use an average of over 11,000 disposable menstrual products in their reproductive lifetime.

I’ve written before about the damage done to marine environments by tampons being flushed and there is also the horrible fact that most sanitary products are predominantly plastic, which even in landfill will not biodegrade.

Not to mention the cost and the controversial tampon tax – we’re still paying it until at least April 2018.

So I am surely a perfect candidate for trying the new generation of period pants… yep, those that you wear with nothing else, with their built in absorbency, which are then washed and re-used…. Surely I’m totally fine with that?

Yet I am also a product of my generation. A ‘grumble about PMT and wanting chocolate’ is perfectly acceptable female bonding but we rarely discuss the detail of how we deal with actual blood in varying quantities. We are used to neat and discrete. We are used to peculiar fragranced products and adverts showing blue fluid.

I was sent a prototype of WUKA wear absorbent period pants – WUKA stands for Wake up, Kick Ass, Period.

I put them on with trepidation. The underwear is no worse looking than my dreaded red period pants although in a more muted navy. They are fuller coverage than ‘normal’, ‘sexy’ knickers but are sleek and comfortable and certainly not visible under tight jeans.

In fact, based on feedback from testers, the appearance and cut has been improved since the pair I tried, and they look like nice, sporty knickers with a higher leg line.

I tried them for a day and they were fine – they were definitely not going to leak. It is a big shift in behaviour to not change them half way through the day as you would a sanitary towel. But you know what, it is ok and still feels hygienic. They are anti-bacterial so won’t smell and were certainly very absorbent.

I realise my language is slightly tepid – ‘fine’, ‘ok’ but that is the reality. This doesn’t make my period go away or suddenly become incredible, it just makes it ok, something to forget about.

Washing them too, is ‘fine’. I’m not squeamish about giving the pants a little rinse before chucking them in the machine (although this rinse isn’t required) – at 40 degrees.

Then I had a breakthrough moment.

Period arrived one evening. Plenty of tampons but no towels. I don’t like wearing tampons at night so felt a bit glum. Then I recalled the Period Pants. They were not ‘fine’ or ‘ok’ they had become the Period Pants of Wonder (P-POW). It was with genuine excitement that I pulled them on and slept comfortably, realising that I don’t have to be a consumer and that with these, I am always prepared.

So here’s my verdict:

Daytime use: fine – they absorb four tampons worth so really are safe and secure. Some people may choose to wear them as a back-up for a tampon on heavy days or when your period might start but hasn’t yet, especially while you learn to trust them and shift  your perception of what you do at that TOTM.

Night-time use – Pants of Wonder, Pants of Joy. Comfortable, leak-free and always there for you.

Every woman should have a few pairs of these. They’ll save you money in the long run, protect the environment and stop you being a monthly slave to parting with money just to chuck it away. I’ll be buying more and using them in the day too now I’ve got used to the whole concept.

The project is still at the funding stage, with a Kickstarter campaign. Pledge here to support production of the undies and receive your pair of pants when they are made.

My pair of pants was sent to me to try for free by Ruby at Wuka wear in exchange for feedback that helped improve the product.

 

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Accidental wildness

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Back to school after the half term break and we’ve let wildness slip. Well, ‘formal deliberate’ wildness that is. We’ve nevertheless still achieved something wild every day, those Random Acts of Wildness, although not necessarily of the ‘photo and tweet it’ variety.

We’ve discovered a good climbing tree. If I give them a boost up to the first branch (at my head height) they can then get scarily high. The branches seem sturdy but there is definitely an element of risk (which is why they love it so much).

My daughter is obsessed with picking wild flowers at the moment, and the leaf mantises that we are babysitting necessitate the collection of lots of bramble for them to eat. They’ve gone to school today,  I felt like such a celebrity in the playground when I was holding them!

We also had a gardening session on our jungle (aka back garden), with both kids working well together to rescue snails and prune overgrown shrubs.

At the weekend, there was a gorgeous split second of wildness when a stoat crossed the road ahead of our car, followed by 6 or 7 kits. Too cute!

I’m heartened that whilst we’ve been a bit lacking in planned nature time, we’ve still managed to make space for outdoors discovery every day.

Next on the list; a picnic to celebrate Picnic Week!

30 Days Wild – week one

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It was typical that all things were against us for our first few days of being wild. The wet and windy half-term weather combined with lots of driving for a family funeral meant we were up against it to fit in moments of nature.

Day 1: A wet walk, collecting pebbles and leaves. We wouldn’t have bothered with a walk today, given the weather, but it was good to get the wellies on and get outside.

Day 2: Hours on the M25 but there were birds to be spotted through the window – we saw a kestrel, herring gulls and two buzzards in the course of our journey.

Day 3 – 5:  This is where the game changed. We went camping to a basic, natural and beautiful campsite with lots of friends. It is harder to pick the unwild moments from the day, because there weren’t any.

Wild highlights included:

  • finding toad tadpoles
  • making mudcakes
  • collecting an incredible array of sea creatures and shells at the beach (starfish, crabs, anemones, clams, bristle worms to name a few)
  • being woken early by birdsong – there was a particularly vocal robin at 5 am
  • and mainly just being outside all the time.

This was wildness that took more than one bath to scrub off.

Day 6: Back to school, but incredible sunshine. My daughter picked poppies on the way to school (her teacher is very tolerant of the random assortment of nature that gets brought in by my collector girl on a daily basis). After school, we lay in a hammock  and looked up at the trees – we are living with Granny at the moment and enjoying her beautiful garden very much.

Day 7: We’ll be trying some art activities from ‘Collect, print and paint from nature’ by John Hawkinson later. It’s very old-school (published in 1968) and we won’t be setting up a killing jar for butterflies as recommended (using 880 ammonia or carbon tetrachloride!), but the rest is lovely!

It’s been a week of extremes – days where it has been hard to fit in wildness, and days where it has been abundant. I’m glad we’ve managed to make a little space for nature whatever the week and the weather has thrown at us.

The world needs young nature geeks

They say that whatever issue you have with a toddler, you can multiply by ten for the teenager. Whilst inspiring tiny children about the great outdoors has its challenges, they are nothing compared to trying to keep young people involved with and excited about nature as they hit the often rocky, hormonal years of teenagedom.

I know from personal experience that even the most rural, idyllic childhood doesn’t prevent a rapid descent into nightclubbing and alcohol – who has time for nature then? My children are a while off that, but I wonder how I will keep them connected to our natural world.

Wonderful campaigns such as the Wildlife Trust’s ‘Every Child Wild’ and the work done by The Wild Network help the parents of younger children to embrace nature. Whilst there is no deliberate exclusion of teenagers from these projects (and much remains highly relevant), there is a focus on reaching out to younger children. To then lose that connection in the fug of the teenage years seems such a tragedy.

Time in nature is vital for everyone’s health and well-being and in the turbulent, exam-packed teenage years, stress relief and green exercise are just what the doctor ordered. Despite all the medical evidence, society still thinks it is more normal for a teenager to be holed up in a darkened room on social media than roaming the countryside with a pair of binoculars.

A more worrying aspect is the bullying that young people can experience if they are into nature. Being called a geek, nerd or twitcher can be the least of it. In a world that values material consumption and the quick thrill of the digital, choosing to spend time, often on your own or with the older generation, can mark you out as an odd ball.

A Focus on Nature is a youth nature organisation aiming to address this. It offers a community for young people who love nature, as well as looking at the wider issue of disconnection of teens from our natural world. The website is full of stories of young conservationists getting out there and not just connecting with nature, but taking real action.

Wildlife charities do offer teenage options for involvement. The RSPB’s Phoenix membership provides Wingbeat, the only environmental magazine written by teenagers for teenagers, and opportunities to become part of and blog on the Phoenix forum. For those interested in volunteering or work experience, most conservation charities can give exciting and varied opportunities that could lead to a career in conservation.

With social media, there is a platform ready and waiting for our tech savvy teens. We would all benefit from more young voices to shock us oldies out of our comfortable complacency and to make caring about our planet the norm, not the geeky exception.

Teenagers need nature and green spaces in their life. It will bring them fun, stress-relief, new friends and turn them into true custodians of our world.

It’s been a while (ahem) since I was a teenager and I don’t yet have my own, so I’m very interested in your thoughts and experiences on this important issue.

 

First published in the EDP and EADT.

 

Eco-gifting for the family

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Are you one of the smug people who has nearly finished their Christmas shopping? Or are you a last minute, dash around the shops type? Either way, you are currently being bombarded by marketing galore.

Constant emails and cutesy catalogues will try to persuade you that all women desire purple silk underwear or fluffy ear muffs. Meanwhile, the man in your life absolutely requires a designer leather iPad cover embossed with his initials and the children will have a Christmas to remember ONLY if you buy them their own body-weight in overpriced, branded plastic.

We will all receive items that we don’t want or need and we will all spend a bit more than we should have done. Whilst our bank balances can hopefully recover in the New Year, it’s not so rosy for the environment because all consumerism has a direct impact on the planet. Now I’m not so mean as to suggest we don’t give presents, my children would still be crying by New Year’s Day if I was that horrible. However, burying them in an excess of new possessions doesn’t do them any favours.

Over-gifting your kids can result in them acquiring a spoilt, entitled attitude, not looking after their new toys properly and expecting even more next year. You know what over-gifting looks like: the child is swamped by presents which they open in an increasingly mechanical, zombie like way, finding it hard when the supply eventually stops.

To try and rein myself in (because it is so easy to get carried away) I love the gifting advice that goes ‘Want. Need. Wear. Read’ and try to apply it to shopping for the kids.

Want
A present is never wasted if it is what someone really, really desires. If you have no clue, then ask, or at least give vouchers rather than buying them the thing you secretly want. Yes, Dads with that Star Wars Lego, I’m talking to you!

Need
So it’s a little more on the boring side, but for children this is where the more sensible purchases come in, such as a new duvet set, furniture for their room, hairbrush or swim kit. Although my cousins were given toothpaste every year – I think that may be taking it a bit far.

Wear
Much as I love a festive jumper, giving it on Christmas Day means it is hardly going to be worn. If you must, then size up so growing children can wear it the next year too. Onesies, special dresses and organic cotton pjs make excellent choices here.

Read
The gift of a book is the most wonderful of all. What could be more perfect than giving them a whole world, for you to read together or for older children to discover alone? I don’t think anyone can have too many books.

Stockings
What about stockings? That’s helping Father Christmas plan your child’s stocking obviously. I try and keep to the above rules when, er, suggesting ideas to the elves. That is, something from each category of: want, need, wear, read – but we do have a whole stocking to stuff.

Eco-friendly ‘consumables’ are great filler options, such as Fair-trade organic chocolates, dried fruit, an all-natural bath bomb or lip balm, or shower gel. I also feel Santa should always provide useful items such as pants, tights, vests and socks.

When you are tight for time, it is easy to just grab the nearest available items, however eco-unfriendly. Don’t worry though, I’ve collated some green and thoughtful stocking ideas that will help!

Baby and toddler stocking ideas
I honestly wouldn’t go crazy for this age group – a couple of nice, eco-friendly toys and then a few practical items will be plenty.

I love these lovely sustainable wooden grasping toys by EverEarth.

A gnome leaf stacking toy.

Felt animals (3+).

Wooden letters for the bedroom door, like these.

Wooden cars (these mini ones are 3+).

Cutlery and plate sets.

Gorgeous Stockmar beeswax crayons.

Primary age stocking ideas
Eco action trump cards – a fun way of learning about taking care of the environment.

Mini boxes of a favourite ‘treat’ cereal.

Learn about natural energy sources with a potato-powered clock.

A new water bottle – this one is made from recycled plastic and has a charcoal filter.

A wind-up torch.

Wooden jewellery.

A flannel with their favourite character on.

A grow your own carnivorous plants kit.

Lavender and wheat filled teddies, that can be microwaved and will make the bed all cosy (so you can turn the heating down).

Teenager stocking ideas
A bead and hoop necklace, fairly traded and made from all natural materials.

Star wars origami.

These gorgeous birch candle holders.

Vouchers – probably iTunes.

An adult colouring book inspired by nature.

Pretty glass earring dish.

Slightly crazy, but low eco-impact, face drinks mats.

Who says money doesn’t grow on trees? Grow your own money (plant).

I also enjoyed these eco-gift suggestions from River Cottage HQ, and don’t forget second-hand items are perfect too. Now is also a great time to take any outgrown toys to the charity shop so someone else can benefit!

Above all, don’t go overboard on the pressies, do get out for some fresh air and do remember that possessions don’t bring happiness, it’s all about being together in your very own crazy, unique way.

Kate Blincoe is the author of The No-Nonsense Guide to Green Parenting (Green Books) and is a freelance writer.

Children and real tools – really stupid or really important?

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Gardening is amazing for children. Fresh air, exercise and learning about their world all make for wholesome fun but it can also do masses for confidence and motor skills. When they are under three, then a bucket and spade can keep them occupied for ages. But as they get a little older, they ‘wanna be like you ooh ooh’, and that means proper, grown up tools.

Sharp secateurs, long handled rakes and juddering pressure washers in the hands of impetuous, impulsive individuals may sound like a recipe for disaster, but if you want your child to stay interested in gardening past pre-school age then it’s time to, gulp, hand over the tools.

The Forest School ethos includes using real tools because they teach children responsibility and risk assessment. Of course, you’ll need to do the safety chat (never run with tools, keep away from others when you are working, don’t leave them on the ground and so on) and feel confident that your child is coordinated and sensible enough to handle something potentially dangerous.

Often, you will see a whole new side to your child when they feel trusted. Part of giving them this responsibility is stepping back and letting them get on with it – helicoptering over them while they work will frustrate them. Yes, your hedge may look a little odd when they have finished, but they will be glowing.

Accidents can happen – my son was given a penknife for Christmas (aged 6). He has cut himself twice and now has a healthy respect for the blade and actually listens to my advice on how to use it safely. I hope he won’t hurt himself again, but he might. You may not be happy with this level of risk, so choose your activities to suit your own views.

If you are prepared to spend a little money, then try slightly down-sized tools that fit small hands better, thus improving the safety and ease of use. Draper’s does a good range of young gardener equipment that is reasonably priced, such as spades and rakes. They feel ‘proper’ – no babyish plastic here but include features such as a wrist strap on trowels.

And at this time of year, with everything growing like a jungle, I need all the help I can get.