The world needs young nature geeks

They say that whatever issue you have with a toddler, you can multiply by ten for the teenager. Whilst inspiring tiny children about the great outdoors has its challenges, they are nothing compared to trying to keep young people involved with and excited about nature as they hit the often rocky, hormonal years of teenagedom.

I know from personal experience that even the most rural, idyllic childhood doesn’t prevent a rapid descent into nightclubbing and alcohol – who has time for nature then? My children are a while off that, but I wonder how I will keep them connected to our natural world.

Wonderful campaigns such as the Wildlife Trust’s ‘Every Child Wild’ and the work done by The Wild Network help the parents of younger children to embrace nature. Whilst there is no deliberate exclusion of teenagers from these projects (and much remains highly relevant), there is a focus on reaching out to younger children. To then lose that connection in the fug of the teenage years seems such a tragedy.

Time in nature is vital for everyone’s health and well-being and in the turbulent, exam-packed teenage years, stress relief and green exercise are just what the doctor ordered. Despite all the medical evidence, society still thinks it is more normal for a teenager to be holed up in a darkened room on social media than roaming the countryside with a pair of binoculars.

A more worrying aspect is the bullying that young people can experience if they are into nature. Being called a geek, nerd or twitcher can be the least of it. In a world that values material consumption and the quick thrill of the digital, choosing to spend time, often on your own or with the older generation, can mark you out as an odd ball.

A Focus on Nature is a youth nature organisation aiming to address this. It offers a community for young people who love nature, as well as looking at the wider issue of disconnection of teens from our natural world. The website is full of stories of young conservationists getting out there and not just connecting with nature, but taking real action.

Wildlife charities do offer teenage options for involvement. The RSPB’s Phoenix membership provides Wingbeat, the only environmental magazine written by teenagers for teenagers, and opportunities to become part of and blog on the Phoenix forum. For those interested in volunteering or work experience, most conservation charities can give exciting and varied opportunities that could lead to a career in conservation.

With social media, there is a platform ready and waiting for our tech savvy teens. We would all benefit from more young voices to shock us oldies out of our comfortable complacency and to make caring about our planet the norm, not the geeky exception.

Teenagers need nature and green spaces in their life. It will bring them fun, stress-relief, new friends and turn them into true custodians of our world.

It’s been a while (ahem) since I was a teenager and I don’t yet have my own, so I’m very interested in your thoughts and experiences on this important issue.

 

First published in the EDP and EADT.

 

So how did I perform?

Last year I wrote of my rather unusual green resolutions for the New Year (and recently reposted them). I’d forgotten them, but because I’d recorded them I have no excuse. I can go back and see how I’ve performed. They were a bit strange, it turns out.

1)            Forget your manners

This was about eBaying unwanted gifts being better for the environment than shoving them in a cupboard. I loved all my pressies last Christmas, but I have sold or given away plenty of other unwanted items over the year. Result: Eco-win.

2)            Have more sex

Suddenly wishing I hadn’t announced that one! In the interests of preserving some degree of modesty, I can only confirm that I have not divorced in the past year; hence there is no need for the un-green two houses and double set of everything. Result: Eco-win.

3)            Don’t go to the gym

No carbon burned for me to stay fit in 2015. It has been outdoors in nature all the way, running, cycling and walking. Result: Eco-win.

4)            Get a new hairstyle

I suggested that reducing the length of my hair would save blow drying time. This was misguided – after losing four inches my crazy hair required more attention from both the hairdryer and products. I’m growing it again. Result: Eco-fail.

5)            Don’t eat salad

Eating imported lettuce or cucumber in the winter months is bad for the environment. I saved it for the right time of year and enjoyed all the comforting root veg and red cabbages of winter. Result: Eco-win.

6)            Celebrate breasts

This one also sounds odd out of context, but was to do with supporting breast feeding because it is good for the environment as well as the baby. Mine are no longer required in milk-service, but it’s the kind of thing I like to go on about so I think I can say I have achieved it. Result: Eco-win.

7)            Don’t do the washing up yourself

I found this one very achievable. Using the dishwasher on eco-setting, with a marine safe powder has used far less water and energy than the sink. Result: Eco-win.

8)            Don’t get up so early

The later you get up, the more electricity and heating fuel you save on a dark morning. I’m brilliant at sleeping late; sadly the children have other ideas. Lights are blazing by 7 am. Result: Eco-fail.

9)            Ignore the garden

I’m a lazy gardener, so it was no trouble to leave seed heads and piles of leaves to provide food and shelter for wildlife, until springtime. Result: Eco-win.

10)         Don’t go to work

As a writer, I don’t have to travel all that much for work, so this one was easy – I don’t ‘go’ to work. Mind you, many employers are increasingly flexible and a work from home day, cutting transport related emissions, can be possible for many. Result: Eco-win.

I performed pretty well!  Recording the aims and checking back is satisfying and I shall be doing so again this year, although I haven’t quite got round to setting any targets yet… first goal, procrastinate less?

 

First published in a similar form in the EDP and EADT