Forget the commemorative mugs, here is a lovelier way to mark the birth of a child

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So Kate and Wills are in the midst of the pukey/screamy/nappy-changing wonder all over again, but meanwhile, thousands of other people in the UK will be marking the birth of a child no less important. Whilst Princess Charlotte will get bunting, commemorative mugs and endless column inches, there is a much lovelier way to celebrate the newest addition to your family.

Planting a tree for the birth of a child, or as part of their naming day ceremony or christening, is a wonderful way of linking them to the natural world. A tree that is theirs will make them feel special and they will grow older and taller together, recorded in a photo together each birthday. It is a way of planting the child’s roots firmly in the soil.

Every tree planted has massive benefits for the environment. A tree is a mini planet; a perfect eco-system for insects, birds, mammals. A mature oak tree is home to over 280 species of insect alone. Not only that, but it is removing carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and turning it into oxygen for those new lungs to breath.

Ideally, choose a native tree, such as a rowan, silver birch or fruit tree. If space is an issue, then a small bay or rose in a pot is a lovely option. For fruit, try a patio plum tree. These can even be grown on balconies but you’ll need to remember to water them regularly.

When choosing a tree, you may be interested in the symbolism and folklore behind different species. The rowan is the Celtic tree of life and is traditionally planted to celebrate the birth of a new baby. Meanwhile, the oak is linked to strength, wild pear for loyalty, hazel for creativity and cherry for love and protection. Good luck to you if you plant a hawthorn… it apparently results in contradiction.

Of course, a tree so loaded with importance is a risky proposition. What if it dies or you need to move house? You could wait until Autumn for a planting ceremony to increase its chances of survival, watering frequently if you opt for spring or summer planting, or planting two (in the hope that at least one would make it).

If you need to move house and want the young tree to come too, make sure you water it well the day before moving and keep as many of the roots intact as possible. Then, wrap the roots in damp sacking for the move, and replant it as soon as possible into a hole that is bigger than the one you took it out of. And water often, while crossing your fingers.

If every new baby had a native tree planted in its honour, then our world might just look a little greener.

A similar article published in the EDP and EADT

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